| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Stop wasting time looking for files and revisions. Connect your Gmail, DriveDropbox, and Slack accounts and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio will automatically organize all your file attachments. Learn more and claim your free account.

View
 

Radical Skepticism

Page history last edited by Brock Baker 10 years, 11 months ago

Radical Skepticism

 

Required
Pyrrho: Suspending Judgment – p. 29
Sextus Empiricus: Skepticism and Tranquility – p. 29
Hume: Skepticism – p. 85
Descartes: Systematic Doubt – p. 70
Recommended Suggestions
Sextus Empiricus: Ten Methods of Skepticism – p. 30
placeCityBerkeley: Matter Does Not Exist – p. 81
Descartes: Method of Investigation – p. 69

 

Click "Edit" above to add content in this main area, or comment below.

 

What is skepticism according to...?

 

Pyrrho:

 

 

 

Sextus Empiricus:

 

 

 

Hume:

 

 

 

Descartes:

 

Hey everyone! Okay, so I have a question for anyone who wants to answer.  I am wondering what Descartes means when he says (3rd paragraph, 1st line) "Nevertheless I have long had fixed in my mind the belief that an all-powerful God existed by who I have been created such as I am." 

 

 

Criticisms of Radical Scepticism

Descartes: One Indubitable Truth: I Exist – p. 70
Hume: Skepticism – p. 85

Comments (5)

conor said

at 11:04 am on Sep 27, 2009

hey, i think that it means that he had always thought that their was an all-powerful god that created him the ways he is (i.e. the he looks, acts, feels)

CamWilson said

at 12:53 pm on Sep 27, 2009

I think he's using that line as a segue to his next point. Because in the paragraph prior, Descartes outlines how he can't trust his senses because they can be deceived. This line leads him to his next point, in which he uses to deflect the "God counter-argument". That point entails a questioning of everything society takes for granted, and the next one questions the nature of God. Descartes is using that sentence to prepare the reader for upcoming arguments and information, kind of a heads-up that he's going to talk about god next.

Kris Sadek said

at 1:07 pm on Sep 27, 2009

does anybody know is this essay is formal or informal?

Tyson said

at 2:31 pm on Sep 27, 2009

He said you can use "I think... I know this..." and so on, so I guess that means it is informal

Kris Sadek said

at 4:15 pm on Sep 27, 2009

ok good cause that's how i did it

You don't have permission to comment on this page.